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BAFTA 2024 will always remain special for Emma Stone as she bagged the Best Actress award at the 77th awards ceremony.

Emma Stone won the coveted trophy for her role in `Poor Things`, which is a black-comedy sci-fi fantasy.

On winning the award, Emma in her acceptance speech Emma Stone thanked her mother for giving her life and her “Poor Things” screenwriter Tony McNamara for the line “I must go punch that baby”, Variety reported.

“I was playing a British person in this movie and [Neil] did not laugh at me when he taught me how to say `wart-ter,` even though as an American I say `wahter,`” Stone quipped. “So thank you England for accepting me.”

Giving a shout out to her mother, Emma Stone added, “Because she`s the best person I know in the whole world and she inspires me every single day. She`s always made me believe this kind of crazy idea that I could do something like this and I`m beyond grateful. Without her none of this exists – including my life! So thank you for that too, mom!”

Stone also served as a producer on “Poor Things.” “This was the first film that I`ve produced alongside of acting, and so it feels like doubly meaningful because they`ve just both in front of me behind. It was incredible to be part of it,” Stone said, addressing a post-awards press conference.

In `Poor Things`, Stone essays the Frankenstein-like Bella, who`s created by a reclusive Victorian doctor. She looks like an adult woman but, at the beginning of the film, has the mental capacity of a toddler and soon embarks on a sex-filled quest to understand the world around her.

This is Stone`s second BAFTA win, having previously taken home the Golden Mask for leading actress in 2017 for her role in “La La Land” opposite Ryan Gosling. 

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